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Welcome to the FSU CCES Team page. The CCES is a cooperative project to conduct a large scale survey of public opinion during the 2006 mid-term elections. Over 30 academic teams from major universities are involved in the effort.

The study consists of a pre-election and post-election panel survey administered over the internet by Polimetrix. Each wave of the study will contain a set of shared questions used by all teams and a set of questions controlled by each academic team. The common component question will be given to over 30,000 respondents. These questions provide a wealth of information about the background and basic political opinions of respondents. Individual team questions will be given to a subset of 1000 respondents drawn from the larger pool of 30,000+ subjects. The first phase of the survey will be conducted during October with a follow-up to all respondents given the day after the election in November. To learn more about the CCES study, visit the main study website by clicking here.

Questions developed by the FSU team span a range of interests, including the role of risk and uncertainty in decision making, trust in public institutions, policy opinions on trade, immigration, foreign relations, social security, and healthcare, and citizen responses to midterm campaign context. The data from this project will be available at the end of December. Check back in the spring for papers developed from these data. Below you will find information on the survey instruments, the sample frame and the research projects of individual faculty.

Survey Instruments and FSU Module Sample Frame

Faculty and Student Projects on the FSU Module

Faculty

Jason Barabas, Experiment exploring uncertainty in elite information cues, public perceptions of Iranian weapons of mass destruction capabilities, and military response options

Charles Barrilleaux, Risk aversion, uncertainty, and healthcare

Robert Crew, Public response to campaign context

Sean Ehrlich, Opinions on “fair trade” products

Robert Jackson, Experiment exploring race cues and opinions on healthcare and immigration

Jennifer Jerit, Experiment on framing and support for social security privatization

Cherie Maestas, Experiment on the effect of event cues on trust in government; Public response to campaign context

Chris Reenock, Credible commitment problems in immigration policy and crime prevention

Jeff Staton, Credible commitment problems in immigration policy and crime prevention

Atiya Kai Stokes-Brown, Experiment exploring race cues and opinions on healthcare and immigration; Experiment exploring the effects of candidate gender and candidate support

Graduate Students

Cynthia Rugeley, Public opinion about state legislatures

Melissa Neal, Experiment exploring the effects of candidate gender on candidate support